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Felix Mitterer: On the passing away of Wolfgang Pfaundler
Ross Grind

On April 20, 2015 Wolfgang Pfaundler von Hadermur (as it stands on the party note) died in Ötztal hamlet Piburg. Several years ago, he retired here, cared for by his consort Herlinde Menardi, a folklorist. For three days he was then laid out in the room of the old farm, as was always the custom, but actually no longer allowed. The kids just did it. The Piburger and the Oetzer came to the Rosary. Pfaundler stood high in their respect.

Apart from the legendary governor Eduard Wallnöfer, only Wolfgang Pfaundler is considered to be so much the epitome of the Tyrolean, Tyrolean, and Tyrolean patriots. But that was not his birth. For Pfaundler was born not in Tyrol, but on 1 January 1924 in Vienna, grew up there and went to school. Piburg - that was just the summer residence of the family. His father's name was Hermann Pfaundler and, as a lawyer, head of section in the Federal Chancellery. The mother's name was Gertrud Schönfeld and came from a Jewish Budapest family. As a 14-year-old sees Wolfgang, as the Vienna Nazis force Jewish neighbors to brush the sidewalks on his knees. At school, Wolfgang is called a "Saujud" (Jews' sow). Then the Nazis ask Father Hermann to divorce the Jewish woman. The father refuses, loses his high official position and must feed the family throughout the war with the grant of tutoring. All this characterizes Wolfgang and will lead him to organize the resistance in the Ötztal as a 20-year-old and hiding refugees and deserters in the woody cliffs above Piburg.

On Friday, April 24, at 2 pm, I stand in front of an old grave plate, which is embedded in the cemetery wall of Oetz. Dr. Meinhard von Pfaundler (1872-1947) is buried here, professor of paediatrics in Munich, so famous as a pediatrician, that he was even brought to the Tsar's court. This is a brother of Wolfgang's father. He also loved Piburg very much and built himself a beautiful house in the 1920s directly above the lake, which belonged to him and which he then donated to the community Oetz. The Pfaundleri were thus Tyroleans who went out into the world to become something there. The young Wolfgang Pfaundler came back to become something in Tyrol.

The ancient farm, of which I had always believed that the Pfaundler family had been stuck and proud of it since the Middle Ages at the latest, had not been in the possession of the family for a long time, and Wolfgang passionately fought for him and carefully prepared him.

The Oetz church stands high on a cliff above the village and the climb is steep, very steep. One wonders how old, frail people managed this over the centuries. Many say goodbye to Wolfgang Pfaundler. All Oetz, all of Piburg, the whole Ötztal takes part, and from afar the old friends have come. Many of them are not coming because they have already gone before Pfaundler, as well as the best of all his friends, Paul Flora. There are also rifle companies, including one from South Tyrol, with them Eva Klotz, the daughter of Georg Klotz, the "partisan" among the South Tyrol fighters. Salut will not be fired. This will have upset the Pfaundler a bit.

Later the funeral meal in the Gasthof Piburger See, which is opposite the Pfaundlerhof. You meet people you have not seen for ages. And wonder how old they have become. (One likes to look over his own age.) Over there at the church it was hot as hell, here on the dark side it is almost too cool to sit outside. We tell each other about the Pfaundler.

At the beginning of the seventies I was invited to the Pfaundler-Hof for the first time. And got to know artists for the first time - writers, painters, composers, even architects. Likewise, people from the university like the Germanists Walter Methlagl and Michael Klein. Pfaundler had discovered me and published texts of mine in his legendary half-year magazine "die Fenster". Pfaundler has either discovered or at least greatly encouraged almost all Tyrolean writers in his active time. The great South Tyrolean poet Norbert C. Kaser, then still misunderstood and outlawed in his homeland, was particularly well supported by Pfaundler and Flora. Not all of them thanked Pfaundler, some of them became enemies of him, distanced themselves from him, denounced him too. But patricide must be well, in the patriarchal Tyrol.

As a young person I did not trust him completely. I, a former working-class child, a failed middle school student and now a forced customs official, who looked up to the 68-year-old revolutionaries in the FRG, read "pardon" and "concrete", had no idea of the Tyrolean cultural life and his personalities. I knew nothing of Pfaundler's existence before he found me. When I found out who supported me there, namely a so-called "Südtirolextremist", who had been sentenced to dungeons for 20 years in absentia, I was somewhat disturbed. For me as a young man, the "Bumser" were all right-wing radicals, with whom I wanted nothing to do. He was the "gray eminence" of Tyrol, it was said, the "cultural pope", you cannot pass him, you want something. And the Jungbürgerbuch, where he earns so much, even though he is not at all the sole author ... and so on and so forth. Besides, I was afraid of him. He seemed to me stern and harsh and authoritarian, and snappy and malicious, and jealous of anyone poaching in "his territory."

So, I searched for justification to be allowed to accept his ongoing promotion with a clear conscience. First of all, I looked at his wife, the noble, fine Gertrud Spat (died 2010), from a good Dutch house, the outstanding pianist, the devoted mother of his four children, his narrowest colleague in the background, the highly educated author of the "Tirol Lexikon", the wonderful hostess. Would this woman take a man for a husband if he is as many as he describes? And then, can one who has Paul Flora as a friend be as the enemies say and as I feared myself? Has such a friend as Arthur Koestler and Manes Sperber? Well, well, they were once communists and had now converted. But they were great poets before, and they remained so. But what should I say about Sperber's remark: "The Pfaundler is my favorite terrorist."

Salvation, when I learned (not from him), was that he had risked his life as a resistance fighter against the Nazis. (Of course, he had been drafted into the Wehrmacht before, as a 17-year-old, in Georgia he was injured by shrapnel, additionally fell ill with dysentery and typhus, but finally made the homecoming to Austria.)

As far as South Tyrol was concerned, I did not change my opinion until years later, when ORF commissioned me to write a four-part book about South Tyrol from 1938 to 1968, researched for two years, sat in archives and talked to many contemporary witnesses. Only then did I realize that active resistance had been necessary for the implementation of at least the autonomy of South Tyrol, even if the right-wing radicals, who later stood up as freeloaders, disavowed this resistance for decades.

Then I opened my eyes, turned to the photographer, and looked at his great black and white images of people, landscapes, cemeteries; looked at his ethnographic films, such as the Wampelerreiten in Axams; unforgettable, wild document of a wild, true folk custom, nothing at all for delicately tempted tourists like many other folk customs.

After Oetz I went with him, saw there an incredible performance of Schönherr's "earth"; he asserted that the ORF made a recording or documented the performance, because no one outside Ötztal understood what was being spoken on stage in the lowest / highest dialect.

At the end of 1981 I wrote "Stigma" for the Volksschauspiele Hall, they did not want the piece there ("pornography, blasphemy!"), The colleagues showed solidarity, we had to leave, nobody picked us up, not even Innsbruck. Pfaundler published the text in the "window", was displayed for it. Pfaundler sent us to Mayor Helmut Kopp in Telfs, who picked us up, without ifs and buts. He was also reported and threatened with shooting his family. Since the threatening phone calls did not cease at home, Pfaundler put his house in Alpbach at our disposal. After the premiere, the unnecessary vortex was over, and we were able to emerge again from the sinking.

Pfaundler and I approached each other more and more, that is to say, I came closer and closer to him, for he, I remarked quite late, had always liked and appreciated me not only as a writer but also as a human being. The wild guy who enthusiastically talked about how a hunting stag biting deep into his shoulder at the sight of a capital stag - the Pfaundler - with excitement - and not to scream - this savage man could be very gentle and affectionate, completely free of them other malice and vanities that so often tormented him.

In the developed barn of the Piburger yard I wrote "The Piefke saga", always the Acherkogel in front of me, who then appeared prominently in the play "In der Löwengrube".

The filmmaker and writer Georg Stefan Troller - living in Paris - became aware of me through "the window" (in all embassies and cultural institutes of the world cities was the magazine) and shot in January 1990, a consequence of his famous ZDF documentary series "Personal description". Since then I have a close friendship with Troller, with the emigrant who was not recalled to Austria after the war - like so many others. the only one who shouted was Axel Corti, and Troller wrote several screenplays for him, about young Freud, about the young Hitler, and then the multi-award-winning trilogy "Where and Back," dealing with his own fate.

In Ireland, of course, the Pfaundler also visited me and photographed in the pouring rain a sad emigrant Felix on Inch beach in County Kerry.

The sponsor Pfaundler had become my friend over the decades, and then he became a father to me.

He, the half or quarter Tyrolean, half or quarter Jew, born in Vienna, grew up, or whatever, was for me the last great Tyrolean. And that's because on the one hand he loved Tyrol above all, risked his life for this country on several occasions, but at the same time was completely cosmopolitan. Homeland love alone is not enough. Unless cosmopolitanism is added, it leads to nationalist dementia.

When I visited him a year ago, at his farm in Piburg, he was sitting on the bench, very frail, very shrunken, saying nothing, gesturing for me to sit next to him. And briefly squeezed my hand. There we sat now. And my heart hurt. Two tourists came by, looked in astonishment at the horse skull under the ridge, and asked what that was. "That's a Rossgrind!" Said Pfaundler. Devoured looks. "That's a horsegrind!" He repeated. "And now disappear, I'll get my book."

He had returned home to Piburg, and that was one of his reasons.

July 2015






 
Pfaundler, Wolfgang (I96)
 
2 1940 Baltimore Census lists Morris as a Salesman for a bag manufacturer. Forman, Morris R (I131)
 
3 1940 Census for Mt Vernon NY lists Lydia as a "lodger" in the household headed by Hugo Eisenmenger. Lydia had been Sonya Eisenmenger's assistant before Sonya divorced Hugo and re-married Ernst Weber in Reno NV. Alber, Lydia (I89)
 
4 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Forman, Robert (I114)
 
5 A well-know artist that painted the frieze in the Austria Parliament Building in Vienna Eisenmenger, August (I29)
 
6 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Charles, Allan (I164)
 
7 ALTERNATE LAST NAME: Bince Bruce, Margaret (I8)
 
8 Alumni Publications
B.A., William Smith College, 1939
FRANCIS R. HODGE

Author of:
Play Directing: Analysis, Communication and Style
Prentice Hall PTR, 1994

Yankee Theatre: The Image of America on the Stage
Ayer Company Publications, 1969

Co-author of:
Dramatic Life As I Found It
Ayer Company Publication; Reprint edition, 1966 
Hodge, Francis R. (I233)
 
9 ANN FLACK HEARD OBIT : Published 11/25/2014

1916 - 2014 (Age 98)

Merritt Island, FL

Ann Flack Heard, 98, passed away Thursday, 20 November 2014 at Wuesthoff Hospice and Palliative Care House, Rockledge, FL. Mrs. Heard was born to Miss Louella and Jesse James Flack, 1 November 1916. She attended Moorhead Sunflower Jr. College, and graduated from Peabody Teachers' College/Vanderbilt. After marriage in 1938, she became a teacher at GA Southwest Junior College. Twice moving to Brevard County as an Air Force wife, she became headmistress of St. Mark's Episcopal Church School in Cocoa and continued on the faculty until her retirement 18 years later in 1979. Ann was determined to find joy in every minute of her life. After retirement from the field of education, she became a highly competitive bridge player, and an avid tennis, basketball, and football fan. She read extensively until macular degeneration prevented her from doing so. She delighted in her family and friends.

Ann was predeceased by her husband, Wade C. Heard; a sister, and two brothers. Survivors include her daughter, Melinda Koethe (husband Jerry); her son, Hampton Heard (wife Virginia) with daughter, Carolyn Szabo (husband Stephen) and their children, Katie, Andy, and Miss Ellile.
 
Flack, Ann (I3)
 
10 ANNIE EISENMENGER TIMELINE

1898          Born April 30, 1898, Meran, Southern Tyrol

1920-21     Attended Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Applied Arts)
 
1924          Studied at General Sculpture School of the "Akademie der Bildenden Künste" under Joseph Müllner

1924-25     Studied at Special School of Sculpture, under Joseph Müllner
 
1928          Studied at Special School of Sculpture, also under Müllner
 
1931          Completed Credo Altar, originally titled Glaubensgeheimnisse des Credo
 
1940          Found in Vienna directory Eisenmenger, Anna, af. Bildhauerin, IV Favoritenstrasse 12 (Bi ldhauerin Sculptor)
 
1954          Illustrates book Man Meets Dog with brother-in-law Konrad Lorenz
 
1959          Credo Altar Installed in Notkirche or ?emergency church? Zum Gottlichen Erlioser
 
1960          Completed mosaic mural of St. Francis of Assisi as well as label panels for the Schoenbrunn Zoo in Vienna
 
1961          Credo Altar transferred to the Doblinger Pfarrkirche St. Paul in Hofzeile 
 
1971          Credo Altar sold to an art dealer
 
2004          Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. purchases Credo Altar from dealer in Vienna 
Eisenmenger, Anna (I32)
 
11 Artist Eisenmenger, Anna (I32)
 
12 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hoffberger, Lois (I151)
 
13 Barbara Swetman Meyer 12/16/1933 - 5/4/2015 OBITUARY

Barbara Swetman Meyer, adored and adorable wife, mother and grandmother, passed away in the afternoon of Monday, the 4th of May, 2015, in her home in Houston, Texas. Barbara Swetman was born in Rowlands, Mississippi the 26th of December, 1933. Barbara graduated with honors with a degree in accounting from Louisiana State University in 1955. Barbara married the love of her life, Randall Meyer of Mt. Union, Iowa, the 29th of November, 1958. Barbara met Randall on a blind date during his tenure at Exxon's Baton Rouge Refinery, where she eventually worked as a secretary until they wed. She was proud to tell everyone that they were married for "54 years and 8 days," until his death in 2012. Together they raised and nurtured a loving family of three children, Warren, Gretchen and Kirsten.

In her free time in her younger years, she loved to play bridge and tennis with her close friends, play the piano and create needlepoint works of art. She was also a skilled fly fisherwoman and skeet shooter. She dedicated herself to supporting Randall's career and was the perfect lighthearted and outspoken balance to his serious business persona. But Barbara's ultimate focus was caring for her children.

She and Randall were passionate about education and made sure that their children had access to and remained motivated to perform at their highest levels from kindergarten through graduate school. While Barbara excelled as a wife and mother, she found her true calling with the birth of the first of her five grandchildren in 1994. Her grandchildren were the world to her, as she was to them. She took the time to recognize, appreciate and celebrate the unique personalities of each of her grandchildren and, by doing so, developed remarkably close and unshakeable bonds with each child. Barbara's grandchildren loved her limitlessly and unconditionally and they will profoundly miss their "crazy redneck Grandma!"

Barbara was preceded in death by her parents, Emory Goss Swetman and Ruby Mae Swetman Stringer; brothers, James Robert and Rod Swetman; and sister, Anelle Swetman Jones. She is survived by her children, Warren Meyer and his wife, Kate, of Phoenix, AZ, Gretchen Meyer Manias and her husband, Bill, of Houston, TX, and Kirsten Meyer Wrinkle and her husband, Geoff of Charlotte, NC; and grandchildren Nicholas and Amelia Meyer of Phoenix, Andrew and Hayden Manias of Houston, and Alex Wrinkle of Charlotte.

Barbara's family wishes to acknowledge and express their sincere gratitude for the love and friendship extended to Barbara by her dear friends and selfless caretakers, Donita, Bunny, Jack, Helen, Janet and Carolyn. Those honored to serve as honorary pallbearers are her five grandchildren.

A memorial service is to be conducted at four o'clock in the afternoon on Saturday, the 27th of June in the Jasek Chapel of Geo. H. Lewis & Sons, 1010 Bering Drive in Houston. In lieu of customary remembrances, and for those desiring, memorial contributions may be directed to the Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS, 66675.

Barbara Meyer was born in rural Mississippi during the Great Depression to meager beginnings, but was a bright child and motivated not only to pursue her education at the college level but also to perform at the highest level. She approached every aspect of her life with a sharp wit and irreverent sense of humor and was a truly authentic individual. Barbara was loving by nature and was generous in heart and spirit. She never knew a stranger and welcomed everyone into her home as their "grandma." In her own words, Barbara declared, "I have lived a great life and would like to be remembered with smiles rather than tears. I would also like to quote my grandson, Andrew, as I write my own epitaph "You don't have to be right, Grandma, you're adorable."

Funeral Home
Geo. H. Lewis & Sons Funeral Directors
1010 Bering Drive Houston, TX 77057
(713) 789-3005

Published in TheAdvocate.com from May 9 to May 10, 2015
 
Swetman, Barbara (I237)
 
14 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hodge, Elizabeth (I83)
 
15 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Pfaundler, Caspar (I99)
 
16 Citation
"U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 - AncestryInstitution.com." U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 - AncestryInstitution.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Jan. 2014..
Notes
Thomas Flack
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Ir
Birth Year: 1730
Spouse Name: Jane Mcquiston
Spouse
Birth Place: Ir
Spouse Birth Year: 1735
Marriage State: of NC

 
Flack, Thomas (I208)
 
17 Citation
"U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 - AncestryInstitution.com." U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 - AncestryInstitution.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Jan. 2014..
Notes
Thomas Flack
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Ir
Birth Year: 1730
Spouse Name: Jane Mcquiston
Spouse
Birth Place: Ir
Spouse Birth Year: 1735
Marriage State: of NC 
McCuistion, Jane (I209)
 
18 Claudette Colbert
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Born Émilie Claudette Chauchoin

September 13, 1903
Saint-Mandé, France
Died July 30, 1996 (aged 92)
Speightstown, Barbados

Nationality American
Other names Lily Claudette Chauchoin
Education Art Students League of New York
Occupation Actress
Years active 1925-1965, 1974-1987
Political party Republican
Spouse(s)

Norman Foster
(m. 1928; div. 1935)
Dr. Joel Pressman
(m. 1935; died 1968)

Claudette Colbert, born Émilie Claudette Chauchoin; September 13, 1903 - July 30, 1996) was an American stage and film actress.

Colbert began her career in Broadway productions during the late 1920s and progressed to motion pictures with the advent of Talking pictures. Initially associated with Paramount Pictures, she gradually shifted to working as a freelance actress. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress in It Happened One Night (1934), and received two other Academy Award nominations. Other notable films include Cleopatra (1934) and The Palm Beach Story (1942).

With her round face, big eyes, charming, aristocratic manner, and flair for light comedy, as well as emotional drama, Colbert was known for a versatility that led to her becoming one of the industry's best-paid stars of the 1930s and 1940s and, in 1938 and 1942, the highest-paid star. During her career, Colbert starred in more than 60 movies. Among her frequent co-stars were Fred MacMurray in seven films (1935-49), and Fredric March in four films (1930-33).

By the early 1950s, Colbert had basically retired from the screen in favor of television and stage work, and she earned a Tony Award nomination for The Marriage-Go-Round in 1959. Her career tapered off during the early 1960s, but in the late 1970s she experienced a career resurgence in theater, earning a Sarah Siddons Award for her Chicago theater work in 1980. For her television work in The Two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987), she won a Golden Globe Award and received an Emmy Award nomination.

In 1999, the American Film Institute posthumously voted Colbert the 12th-greatest female star of classic Hollywood cinema.  
Colbert, Claudette (I192)
 
19 COMMENTS ON HERTHA'S PAINTING

Inspired by a lifetime of travel, Hertha Flack's recent landscape paintings are rendered in bold, rich color. Her work is most often in the impressionistic style, occasionally tending toward abstract. Ms. Flack, who has painted for over 25 years and has had several successful one-person shows, has exhibited in numerous states and is a member of several art organizations. She now works mainly in acrylics.

She has studied with Carole Barnes, Carrie Brown, Maxine Masterfield and Mary Todd Beam. Her home and studio are in Tryon, North Carolina.  
Eisenmenger, Hertha Emma (I12)
 
20 Died of appendicitis. Margarethe never forgave her husband, a renown pediatrician, for not saving Leo.  Escherich, Leopold (I111)
 
21 Died of TB when Phebe was 3 yrs old. Shenk, Fanny (I257)
 
22 Discovery of Escherichia coli
In 1886, after intensive laboratory investigations, Escherich published a monograph on the relationship of intestinal bacteria to the physiology of digestion in the infant. This work, presented to the medical faculty in München and published in Stuttgart, Die Darmbakterien des Säuglings und ihre Beziehungen zur Physiologie der Verdauung (1886) (Enterobacteria of infants and their relation to digestion physiology), was to become his habilitation treatise and established him as the leading bacteriologist in the field of paediatrics.
It was also the publication where Escherich described a bacterium which he called "bacterium coli commune" and which was later to be called Escherichia coli. For the next four years, Escherich worked as first assistant to Heinrich von Ranke at the Munich Von Haunersche Kinderklinik.
Professor of Pediatrics in Graz and Vienna (1890-1911)
In 1890, Escherich succeeded Rudolf von Jaksch, who had been called to Prague, as professor extraordinary of pediatrics and director of the St Anna children's clinic in Graz, where he became professor ordinary four years later. While working in Graz, he married Margarethe Pfaundler (1890-1946), daughter of the physicist Leopold Pfaundler. They had a son Leopold (born 1893), who died at age ten, and a daughter Charlotte (called "Sonny" - born 1895), who survived to the 1980s. Escherich made the Graz pediatric hospital one of the best-known institutions in Europe.
 
Escherich, Theodor (I27)
 
23 DYER COUNTY, TN - MARRIAGES - 1860 - 1880 Surnames F
http://files.usgwarchives.net/tn/dyer/marriages/1860-1880-f.txt


"Flack, J. Y. Bunce, Margaret 26 May 1874"
 
Family F3
 
24 Elisha Flack
mentioned in the record of Elisha Flack and Ann Boon
Name Elisha Flack
Event Type Marriage
Event Date 07 Feb 1821
Event Place Guilford, North Carolina, United States
Gender Male
Spouse's Name Ann Boon
Spouse's Gender Female
CITING THIS RECORD

"North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 ", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJ9-Q7K7 : accessed 3 April 2016), Elisha Flack and Ann Boon, 1821. 
Flack, Elisha (I19)
 
25 Elisha Flack
United States Census, 1870
Name Elisha Flack
Event Type Census
Event Year 1870
Event Place North Carolina, United States
Gender Male
Age 70
Race White
Race (Original) W
Birth Year (Estimated) 1799-1800
Birthplace North Carolina
Page Number 1


HOUSEHOLD

ROLE

GENDER

AGE

BIRTHPLACE

Elisha Flack M 70 North Carolina
Anne Flack F 71 North Carolina
Woodson Flack M 28 North Carolina
CITING THIS RECORD

"United States Census, 1870," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MW8S-SZN : accessed 3 April 2016), Elisha Flack, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 1, family 3, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,639. 
Flack, Elisha (I19)
 
26 Emma Singer von Wyszogurska Singer, Emma (I105)
 
27 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Pfaundler, Caspar (I99)
 
28 FRANCIS HODGE COLLECTION
University of Texas Libraries - Fine Arts Library Archival Collections

About the Collection

NOTE this collection has not been fully housed and cataloged (7/2016)

For further information regarding this collection, please contact the Humanities Liaison Librarian for Performing Arts, Corinne Forstot-Burke at cfburke@austin.utexas.edu or +1 512 495 4482.

Biography

Francis R. Hodge was born in Geneva, New York, in December 17, 1915. He earned degrees from Hobart College and Cornell University. He was a member of the faculty at The University of Texas at Austin from 1949 until he retired in 1979 as professor emeritus. Prior to coming to the University he taught at Carroll College, Cornell University, and the University of Iowa. He served in the United States Army Air Force from 1942 until his discharge in 1945 at the rank of staff sergeant.

During his 30-year career in the Department of Drama (now the Department of Theatre and Dance), he taught classes in every aspect of theatre activity, but his primary interests were in theatre history and directing. He directed more than 55 plays. He was especially known for his interpretations of the works of Lope de Vega, Marlowe, Farquhar, Ibsen, O?Casey, Anouilh, Bertolt Brecht, Eugene Ionesco, and George Bernard Shaw. As the producer/supervisor of the MFA program in directing he supervised more than 100 master?s candidates through their departmental careers as each directed, first an original student written one act play, and then, a fully produced production of a full-length play. As a mentor he was without peer; he challenged his students and gave unstintingly of his experience, energy, and talents to those who had the good fortune to study with him.

He was a guest professor at the University of Colorado, the University of British Columbia, and the Banff School of Fine Arts at the University of Alberta over the course of several summers. Hodge wrote extensively for scholarly journals in his field. He served as the editor of the Educational Theatre Journal (1966-68) and was theatre editor for the Quarterly Journal of Speech (1959 1962). He was on the executive boards of both the American Society for Theatre Research and the Theatre Library Association. He is the author of Yankee Theatre (University of Texas Press, 1965) and Play Directing: Analysis, Communication, and Style (Prentice-Hall, 1971). This book has become the seminal text for the teaching of directing technique throughout the United States. In 1972, he was named a Fellow of the American Theatre Association in recognition of his leadership and contributions to educational theatre.

Citation: Nancarrow, D., Jennings, C., and Isackes, R. "In Memoriam: Francis Hodge." Memorial Resolution published by the Faculty Council of the University of Texas at Austin. 13 Aug. 2008.

 
Hodge, Francis R. (I233)
 
29 Fred W. Jones Jr. (October 24, 1924 - October 22, 2000) was a judge of three levels of court in his native U.S. state of Louisiana, based in Ruston in Lincoln Parish.

A native of Rayville in Richland Parish in North Louisiana,

Jones graduated from the Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the Louisiana State University Law Center in Baton Rouge, he was admitted to the practice of law in 1949. Jones served in the United States Army during World War II and was an assistant staff judge advocate in the Korean War.

Jones was married to the former Anelle Swetman (1927-2009), a daughter of Emory G. Swetman (1901-1963) and the late Ruby F. Stringer Swetman. Jones was a member of the Chamber of Commerce and Kiwanis International, he was a deacon of the First Baptist Church of Ruston and a trustee of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. In their later years, they were members of a non-Southern Baptist congregation, the Northminster Church in Monroe, Louisiana; the Joneses had three daughters, Sherryl J. Tucker and husband, Robert, of Baton Rouge, Denise J. Wiltcher and husband, Thomas, of Amarillo, Texas, and Michelle J. Barker and husband, Mark, of Knoxville, Tennessee. There are also three grandchildren.

Jones held the elected position of Ruston city judge from December 1954 until 1966, when he then became judge of the Louisiana 3rd Judicial District for Lincoln and Union parishes, based in Ruston. In 1975, Judge Jones ran for the first time, unsuccessfully, for the Louisiana Second Circuit Court of Appeal, based in Shreveport and encompassing nine parishes, he lost to fellow Democrat Charles A. Marvin, a native of Jonesville in Catahoula Parish who had briefly resided in Jones' Richland Parish but was then the district attorney of Bossier and Webster parishes. In the nine-parish race, Marvin polled 16,106 votes; Jones, 14,521. There was no Republican candidate. Marvin succeeded the retiring Judge H. Welborn Ayres, a native of Natchitoches Parish, who retired at the mandatory age of seventy-five. In 1980, Jones was elected to the Circuit Court of Appeal as a colleague of Judge Marvin, he retired from the court in December 1990.

Jones was a member of the National Council of Juvenile Court Judges and the American Judicature Society,[4] he often spoke out in public forums on the breakdown of the American family. "The most effective deterrent of crime in this country is the strengthening of family ties ... bringing the people of a family together." Similar remarks were often made by other state court judges, including James E. Bolin of Minden and George W. Hardy Jr. of Shreveport.

Jones died two days before his 76th birthday. 
Jones, Jr, Judge Fred W. (I252)
 
30 From Budapest Jewish family, her husband, Hermann Pfaundler, refused to divorce her during the WW II Nazi occupation and lost his notable position in the Federal Chancellery. Her son, Wolfgang, became a partisan resistance fighter. He was convicted in absentia during the war in Austria and Italy, but was later exonerated.  Schonfeld, Gertrude (I95)
 
31 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Blum, Lawrence (I153)
 
32 Hermann Pfaundler von Hademur

A lawyer, head of section in the Federal Chancellery. He was married to Gertrud Schönfeld who came from a Jewish Budapest family. During WW II occupation, the Nazis asked Hermann to divorce the Jewish woman. He refused, losing his high official position and throughout the war fed his family by tutoring. 
Pfaundler, Hermann (I42)
 
33 HIGH SCHOOL

Graduated 1934 from A.B. Davis High School Mt. Vernon, NY  
Eisenmenger, Hertha Emma (I12)
 
34 HONORS - AWARDS

- The U.S. President's Certificate of Merit from President Harry S. Truman in 1948
- The AIEE Education Medal in 1960, for excellence as a teacher in science and electrical engineering, for creative contributions in research and development, for broad professional and administrative leadership and in all for a considerate approach to human relations
- Eta Kappa Nu naming him an Eminent Member in 1962
- The IEEE Founders Medal in 1971, for leadership in the advancement of the electrical and electronics engineering profession in the fields of education, engineering societies, industry and government
- The Microwave Career Award from the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society in 1977
-The U.S. National Medal of Science from President Ronald Reagan in 1987
- To honor him, IEEE renamed in 1996 the IEEE Engineering Leadership Recognition Award to IEEE Ernst Weber Engineering Leadership Recognition.
 
Weber, Ernst (I106)
 
35 James Monroe Flack, business executive 1946-1974. Served as lieutenant Commander United States Navy, 1942-1945.

BACKGROUND
Flack, James Monroe was born on August 29, 1913 in Baxterville, Mississippi, United States. Son of Jesse James and Lenora (Lucas) Flack.

EDUCATION
Bachelor of Science, Delta State University, 1935; Master of Divinity, Yale University, 1942; postgraduate, Harvard University, 1952.

CAREER
Principal, Shaw (Mississippi) High School, 1935-1939; with employee relations department, Standard Oil Corporation of New Jersey, 1946; officer, director subsidiary, Textron, Inc., 1946-1953; vice-president, director, Indian Head, Inc., from 1953; vice chairman, Indian Head, Inc., 1972-1974.

MEMBERSHIPS
Served as lieutenant Commander United States Navy, 1942-1945. Member of New York Athletic, Yale of New York City, Red Fox Country, Tryon (North Carolina) Country.

FAMILY
Married Hertha E. Eisenmenger, August 30, 1941. Children: James Monroe, Sonya Karen, Robert Frank, Suzanne Margaret.
father: Jesse James Flack
mother: Lenora (Lucas) Flack

TIMELINE
Education
1935 Delta State University
1942 Yale University
1952 Harvard University

Military Duty
1942-1945 lieutenant Commander United States Navy ? flight instructor

Business Career
1935 - 1939 Principal Shaw (Mississippi) High School
1946 with employee relations department Standard Oil Company of New Jersey
1946 - 1953 officer, subsidiary Textron
1946 - 1953 director, subsidiary Textron
1972 - 1974 vice president, Indian Head
1972 - 1974 director, Indian Head
 
Flack, James Monroe (I4)
 
36 JEWEL FRANKLIN FLACK ("FRANK") DIED IN NAVY AIRPLANE CRASH
Kodiak Air Station, AK - 10/3/1945

8 crew members died and 7 survived when a landing was attempted. Plane crashed into the NE slope of Old Woman Mountain, adjacent to the air station.

Frank was USN Radio Electrician's Mate. He was thirty-five years old.

In 1948, Robert Frank Flack, (the son of Frank's brother James M. Flack) was named in Frank's honor.  
Family F52
 
37 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hoffberger, Lois (I151)
 
38 JMF-HEF TIMELINE
-----------------------------------------------------------
1913 JMF (James M Flack) born in Baxter MS: 29 Aug 1913
1916 HEF (Hertha E Flack) born in Cleveland OH: 10 Oct 1916
1920 JMF lived in Baxterville MS w/family: 1920 Census
1934 HEF graduated A.B. Davis High School, Mt Vernon NY
1935 JMF graduated Delta State Teachers College, Cleveland MS
1935-1939 JMF Principal at Shaw MS High School
1938 HEF graduates from Swarthmore College, Swarthmore PA
1939-1942 JMF Yale Divinity School, Divinity Degree
1941 HEF graduated Yale Nursing School, New Haven CT
1941 JMF-HEF marriage at Mt Vernon NY: 30 Aug 1941
1942-1945 JMF Commissioned Naval Officer
__abt-1942 Stationed in Boston (flight school-lived in Wilton CT)
__abt-1943 Stationed in Miami FL
__abt-1944 Stationed in Chicago IL
__abt-1944 Stationed in Minneapolis MN, JMF II born: 20 Apr 1944
__abt-1944 Stationed in Norman OK (date unclear)
__abt-1945 Stationed in Dallas TX
1945 JMF-HEF Lived in Danbury CT
1945 Sonya Karen born Danbury CT: 19 Nov 1945
1946 JMF Standard Oil Corp of NJ, Employee Relations Depart
1946-1950 lived in Westford MA - 2 homes
1946-1953 JMF Textron, Inc. Officer, subsidiary Director
1948 Robert Frank born Westford MA: 19 Feb 1948
1950-1951.abt JMF-HEF lived in San Juan PR: 1123 Piccioni Calle
1952-1954 JMF-HEF lived in Westford MA - 2 homes
1952 Suzanne Margaret born Westford MA: 4 Mar 1952
1953-1972 JMF Indian Head, Inc, Vice-president, Director
1955-1962 JMF-HEF moved from Westford MA to Tryon NC: Aug 1955
1962-1975 JMF-HEF moved to New York City, 3 addresses, kept Tryon home
1972-1974 JMF Indian Head, Inc, Vice-chairman (retired Dec 1974)
1975 JMF-HEF moved back to Tryon NC
1989 JMF died in Moscow: 16 Jun 1989
-----------------------------------------------------------
 
Flack, James Monroe (I4)
 
39 JMF-HEF-WSM TIMELINE
-----------------------------------------------------------
1907 WSM (Wray S Monroe) born in Colorado: 2 Aug 1907
1913 JMF (James M Flack) born in Baxter MS: 29 Aug 1913
1916 HEF (Hertha E Flack) born in Cleveland OH: 10 Oct 1916
1934 HEF graduated A.B. Davis High School, Mt Vernon NY
1935 JMF graduated Delta State Teachers College, Cleveland MS
1935-1939 JMF Principal at Shaw MS High School
1938 HEF graduates from Swarthmore College, Swarthmore PA
1939-1942 JMF Yale Divinity School, Divinity Degree
1941 HEF graduated Yale Nursing School, New Haven CT
1941 JMF-HEF marriage at Mt Vernon NY: 30 Aug 1941
1942-1945 JMF Commissioned Naval Officer
__abt-1942 Stationed in Boston (flight school-lived in Wilton CT)
__abt-1943 Stationed in Miami FL
__abt-1944 Stationed in Chicago IL
__abt-1944 Stationed in Minneapolis MN, JMF II born: 20 Apr 1944
__abt-1944 Stationed in Norman OK (date unclear)
__abt-1945 Stationed in Dallas TX
1945 JMF-HEF Lived in Danbury CT
1945 Sonya Karen born Danbury CT: 19 Nov 1945
1946 JMF Standard Oil Corp of NJ, Employee Relations Depart
1946-1950 lived in Westford MA - 2 homes
1946-1953 JMF Textron, Inc. Officer, subsidiary Director
1948 Robert Frank born Westford MA: 19 Feb 1948
1950-1951.abt JMF-HEF lived in San Juan PR: 1123 Piccioni Calle
1952-1954 JMF-HEF lived in Westford MA - 2 homes
1952 Suzanne Margaret born Westford MA: 4 Mar 1952
1953-1972 JMF Indian Head, Inc, Vice-president, Director
1955-1962 JMF-HEF moved from Westford MA to Tryon NC: Aug 1955
1962-1975 JMF-HEF moved to New York City, 3 addresses, kept Tryon home
1972-1974 JMF Indian Head, Inc, Vice-chairman (retired Dec 1974)
1975 JMF-HEF moved back to Tryon NC
1989 JMF died in Moscow: 16 Jun 1989
1993 HEF-WSM marriage Tryon NC: 21 Jan 1993
2001 WSM died: 21 Sept 2001
2004 HEF moved to Tryon Estates, Columbus NC (assisted-living community)
-----------------------------------------------------------
 
Eisenmenger, Hertha Emma (I12)
 
40 JMF-HEF-WSM TIMELINE
-----------------------------------------------------------
1907 WSM (Wray S Monroe) born in Colorado: 2 Aug 1907
1913 JMF (James M Flack) born in Baxter MS: 29 Aug 1913
1916 HEF (Hertha E Flack) born in Cleveland OH: 10 Oct 1916
1955-1962 JMF-HEF moved from Westford MA to Tryon NC: Aug 1955
1962-1975 JMF-HEF moved to New York City, 3 addresses, kept Tryon home
1975 JMF-HEF moved back to Tryon NC
1989 JMF died in Moscow: 16 Jun 1989
1993 HEF-WSM marriage Tryon NC: 21 Jan 1993
2001 WSM died: 21 Sept 2001
2004 HEF moved to Tryon Estates, Columbus NC (assisted-living community)
-----------------------------------------------------------
 
Monroe, Wray Stockton (I88)
 
41 John Yancey Flack
BIRTH 4 Oct 1820
Guilford County, North Carolina, USA
DEATH 18 Oct 1890 (aged 70)
Dyer County, Tennessee, USA
BURIAL
Hurricane Hill Cemetery
Dyer County, Tennessee, USA
MEMORIAL ID 175860803

Stone is missing

Served with Co.E 45th Reg. Infantry Rockingham Co NC, Civil War
He enlisted 28 August 1862 
Flack, John Yancey (I7)
 
42 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Charles, Joshua Aaron (I80)
 
43 June 1934, Hertha graduated from High School in Mt. Vernon. She had applied for admission to Swarthmore College. Eisenmenger, Hertha Emma (I12)
 
44 Leopold Pfaundler von Hadermur (14 February 1839 - 6 May 1920) was an Austrian physicist and chemist born in Innsbruck. He was the father of pediatrician Meinhard von Pfaundler (1872-1947), and the father-in-law of pediatrician Theodor Escherich (1857-1911).

He studied under chemist Heinrich Hlasiwetz (1825-1875) at Innsbruck, with Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) at the University of Munich, and with Henri Victor Regnault (1810-1878) and Charles Adolphe Wurtz (1817-1884) in Paris. In 1861 he received his doctorate, and in 1867 was appointed professor of physics at the University of Innsbruck. In 1891 he succeeded Ludwig Boltzmann (1844-1906) as professor of physics at the University of Graz. In 1887 he became a full member of the Vienna Academy of Sciences.

Pfaundler is remembered today for his kinetic-molecular explanation of gas reactions under the condition of equilibrium. He was the inventor of a number of scientific apparatuses - devices he often utilized in classroom demonstrations. These included a temperature regulator (1863), a Stromkalorimeter (1869), a differential air thermometer (1875), a seismograph (1897) and a distance meter (1915), to name a few. He is also credited with creating a device for optical demonstration of Lissajous figures (1873).

In 1863-64 he performed a survey of the Stubaier Alps with Ludwig Barth zu Barthenau (1839-1890), and in 1864 he was the first person to ascend to the summit of the Hofmannspitze (3112m).

 
Pfaundler, Leopold (I38)
 
45 Leopold, university professor of physics at the University of Innsbruck in 1891, received a professorship at the University of Graz. There Hermann visited the High School and studied at the University of Graz. He received his doctorate in 1904 from Dr. iur. and then was in the Styrian service as an official. After temporary use in the Central Statistical Commission in Vienna, he came into the k. k. Telegraph Correspondence-Bureau. In 1916, he was assistant director; he was a delegate of the 1917/1918 Bureau in the peace negotiations at Brest-Litovsk in 1933, and in 1926 he took over the management of the official news agency (formerly Burau). After that, he was undersecretary and Section Head of the chancellor's office. The summer months Pfaundler held regularly in Tyrol, was an avid mountaineer and made several first ascents. Pfaundler, Leopold (I38)
 
46 Maiden name could be Hohenberg Hoberg, Anna (I33)
 
47 Margaret Flack is listed as "w (sol Conf) of John Y. Flack. This means she was the widow of John Y. Flack, who was a soldier in the confederate army in the war of the rebellion.

1890 Census: Instructions to Enumerators
http://usa.ipums.org/usa/voliii/inst1890.shtml

...

2. Whether a soldier, sailor, or marine during the civil war (United States or Confederate), or widow of such person.?Write "Sol" for soldier, "Sail" for sailor, and "Ma" for marine. If the person served in the United States forces add "U.S." in parentheses, and if in the Confederate forces add "Conf." in parentheses, thus: Sol (U.S.); Sail (U.S.); Sol (Conf.), etc. In the case of a widow of a deceased soldier, sailor, or marine, use the letter "W" in addition to the above designations, as W. Sol (U.S.), W. Sol (Conf.), and so on.

The enumeration of the survivors of the late war, including their names, organizations, length of service, and the widows of such as have died, is to be taken on a special schedule prepared for the purpose, as provided for by the act of March 1, 1889, and relates only to those persons, or widows of persons, who served in the Army, Navy, or Marine Corps of the United States in the late war. The inquiry concerning the survivors of both the United States and Confederate forces is made on the population schedule so as to ascertain the number now living and the number who have died and have left widows.
 
Source (S12)
 
48 MARIE LOIUSE NECKLACE STORY

ERNST WEBER INTRODUCTION (2nd husband of Sonya Eisenmenger Weber)
Sometime in the summer of 1986, Wolfgang sent me a copy of the "Journal December 1985/January 1986" which contained the story under the title, Al Capone and the Necklace of Maria Louise - A Near Grotesque Criminal Story Told at an Interview by Wolfgang Pfaundler. Since it is printed in German, I have translated it to be added to the Biography of Sonny.


Al Capone and the Necklace of Maria Louise
Almost a crime grotesque according to an interview by
Wolfgang Pfaundler

Last summer died in Innsbruck in her ninetieth year, Sonya Weber, the daughter of Theodor von Escherich, who was the Director of the Children's Clinic in Vienna from 1902 to !911 and had achieved world fame through his discovery of the bacillus Coli Communis, now referred to as Bacillus E, E standing for Escherich. Dr. Sonya Weber worked in the United States of America up to her 86th year as orthopedic specialist. Except for the war years she came every summer from the United States to Oetz to visit her mother, and in fact, was buried in the churchyard of the mountain village Oetz. Her first husband, whose brother Victor will play a prominent role in this interview, was Hugo Eisenmenger. Her second marriage was with the Viennese Physicist Prof. Dr. Ernst Weber who taught in New York City.

"I was born in Graz, Austria, in 1895 and emigrated to the United States in 1913. During the summer of 1914, I returned to Europe with my husband in connection with a Mediterranean cruise. By chance, we bought a newspaper in Genoa, Italy, and read about the murder of the Austrian Crown Prince Franz Ferdinand in Serbia. We knew that my brother-in-law Victor Eisenmenger always travelled with FF-Franz Ferdinand was commonly called FF -and so we thought at once, that he had been killed, too. Victor was the personal physician of FF, both had had serious infections of Tuberculosis. FF was rather arrogant and not an agreeable person and public opinion held that only nice people succumbed to Tuberculosis. Victor and FF spent considerable time in Egypt which was supposed to generally lead to cure. My sister-in-law, Anna Hohenberg, a lady of royal bearing, also had acquired the same infection, and, therefore, also stayed at that time in Egypt, as well as a certain Captain Townsend.

The story I am about to tell occurred in 1928 and relates to the famous necklace that Napoleon gave to Maria Louise at the birth of their son in 1811. When Napoleon was deposed, Maria Louise was smart enough to retain this necklace and bring it back with her to Vienna. The necklace had been composed out of the loveliest diamonds of Europe containing 40 large individual crystals with a pendant of five very large diamonds. Cartier in New York at one time asked me to wear it for examination, but it did not really fit my figure. Anyway, nobody would have believed them to be genuine diamonds.
At that time, I still had to work very hard professionally. One day I received a telegram from Anna Eisenmenger-Hohenberg, "Please call for me at the ship wharf!" Not knowing what it was all about, I called for her. When she arrived, she acted rather secretively and with some dramatic posture. I always addressed her at "Aunt Anna" even though she was my sister-in-law. I had called for her in my personal auto and she immediately examined the back of the car as if she feared someone was hidden there. When the customs examination was finished, I asked again what was the object of her visit. She then said: "I have come as the confidential delegate of Archduchess Maria Theresia" and she confided that the Archduchess owned the Napoleon Necklace. Actually, when FF, Victor and Anna Eisenmenger sojourned in Egypt on account of their Tuberculosis, they had encountered this "Captain Townsend" who apparently was neither Captain nor carried the name Townsend, but was an absolute, but smart, foreflusher. The Archduchess who was a rational and practical mother had been looking for some contact that would facilitate the sale of the necklace and Aunt Anna had suggested Townsend. Maria Theresia had three daughters, Annunciata, not married, and the subsequent Duchesses of Württemberg and of Liechtenstein. Since the necklace could not be divided between the three daughters, the mother wanted to sell the necklace for something like three million dollars and divide the money. However, the economic conditions worldwide were not favorable, the best opportunity appeared in the U.S. The Archduchess concluded to send the necklace to America and to avoid any special attention, she packed the necklace in newspaper and a box for shoes, without insurance, to the address of that "Captain Townsend". Thus, the necklace had been mailed, Townsend had rented, upon the recommendation of the Archduchess a safe deposit box at the Harriman Bank in New York and had given full power to this Captain to sell the necklace if he found a reliable purchaser. The Harriman Bank was the only one where one could get to the safe deposit box during 24 hours, thus exhibit or wear the necklace at any time, and return it at any time. For the first few months after Townsend had confirmed receipt of the necklace, he sent reports. But when no further reply was received, even though the Archduchess had urgently asked for reports, the Archduchess became suspicious. She asked Aunt Anna Eisenmenger to travel at once to New York and check on the situation. At the same time, she had cancelled the power of attorney of Townsend, and had published that fact in the newspapers in New York.

Aunt Anna was quite adventurous and when she arrived and had settled down in our house in Mount Vernon, she wanted to go to the Harriman Bank to verify that the necklace was, indeed, there and had not disappeared with Townsend. I objected and told her that that would be very foolish because Townsend could bring suit against her! But we went to New York to the Hotel Belmont on Lexington Avenue, a good hotel, opposite the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. I have the suspicion that as we entered the hotel at one door, Townsend had gone out the same minute through another door! In fact, as we came to the Reception we were told: "Yes, he had occupied a room here, but he just departed." Now, what should we do? To break into the safe of the Bank we had no key. I did not dare to suggest because it could have terrible consequences. We returned home, and shortly afterwards, the telephone rang. As I took off the receiver, I recognized immediately that it could not be one of my patients, the voice was coarse, and a strange man's voice asked if I was Mrs. Eisenmenger. When I answered yes, he said: " Would you like to know where the necklace is?" I said, "But it is, of course, in the Harriman Bank". "Well, he said, you better look again: it certainly is not there anymore! It is there and there..." and he hung up. I wrote quickly the address he had mentioned on a pad that was fortunately next to the phone, namely on 53rd Street between 5th and 6th Avenues.

Fortunately, I had at that time among my patients a very well-known lawyer, Lewis Untermayer, who, in fact, had warned me before not to break into the safe. I phoned him right away, told him the story and also told him that Aunt Anna wanted to rush to that address not to lose any time. He said, however: "Do not go there in any case! I will send an armed man to a certain spot (and he specified that to me and let me repeat) and when at that spot you see a man who gives you this exact answer, it is the man I am sending."
So, Aunt Anna and I jumped into my car and we drove to the designated spot. We saw there a tall man who gave the correct answer, and he entered my car. It was Mr. Steinhart, a nephew of Untermayer.

On 53rd Street are all jewelers and valuables stores, generally the large dealers. We entered at the specified house, a heavy iron gate opened and quickly closed behind us. I thought, of course, Here we are caught! But then opened a second iron gate and we entered an office where a man sat at a desk. Steinhart had instructed us, "Let me talk, don't say a word, but when I give you a sign, start to talk like a waterfall!" In this way he wanted to gain time. I just was on needles, because the whole thing, necklace or not, really did not concern me personally. I thought about my family and the many children at the clinic, the time lost here, because, after all, I had the office with patients! Well, the man at the desk sat like a spider in her web, and my "guide" began to talk: "I heard that you have the necklace here"...and the other replied, "Yes, I have had it, but I sold it". Steinhart in turn said: "I have been authorized by Untermayer to find out to whom you have sold it!" Oh yes, "I sold it to . . . . and he gave an address about two or three houses further along. We thanked the man, went to the next address, where again: iron gates opened, iron gates closed and again a man at a desk like a spider. He said: "Yes, I bought it two days ago, but I have sold it again". "Oh, yes, and to whom?" He gave an address two houses further along.

At the third address, as we enter, the man says: "Oh, yes, I have it here". Now Steinhart said that we were the personal representatives of the Archduchess and could we see the sales contract? "Oh, yes", replied he, "with pleasure". He showed the contract of sale which amounted to less than $100,000 dollars, though the value of the necklace was at least one million dollars. The sale was signed by witnesses, the last of whom was Archduke Leopold Salvator. Steinhart asked if the necklace was actually there and the man replies, "Yes, it is in the safe behind me." Steinhart now introduced us and said that Baroness Hohenberg had power of attorney from the Archduchess and also had a wax copy of the necklace. He gave me a sign and I started at once to talk, no matter what and at the same time tried to open the container of the wax copy with intentional difficulties. In the meantime, the salesman had opened the safe and taken out the necklace - when suddenly 40 policemen were in the room. Where they had come from, I had no idea, but here they were. Steinhart now said, "I confiscate the necklace". The jeweler tried to resist and referred to the sales contract, but our man answered, "Please, we shall ask for expert valuation of the necklace and when the sales contract is for less than 30 per cent of the valuation, the contract is nullified." It was terribly exciting, the policemen had their revolvers ready and pointing and when we finally were outside, I was completely exhausted. Of course, Steinhart had taken with him the necklace.

When we arrived home, we sent a telegram to the Archduchess that we had secured the necklace, but also that Archduke Leopold Salvator had served as a witness to the sale! Actually, he had already twice been imprisoned and had agreed to give his name for which he had received $10,000 dollars. And what was the final result? He was again put in prison, because he was penniless. However, many of the society ladies took pity, brought him ever caviar to the prison. I, myself, had even the greatest difficulties trying to obtain my physical therapy license. All the cost of the telegrams I had to assume since I was the only one with financial recourse. For me it was very disagreeable. And then, the Archduchess telegraphed, "If the honor of a Habsburg is put in question, I would forego the million dollars." I could have murdered her!

The next morning, I had to leave home by 7:00 a.m. because I had patients scheduled for 8:00 a.m., and Aunt Anna wanted to see Untermayer. Apparently, the excitement was not good for Aunt Anna. After we started with the car she sat in the rear of the car to be proper as passenger. She felt getting weak and, in the mirror, I saw her getting lower and lower. Finally, I had to stop, she vomited the scrambled eggs she had for breakfast, but more than that, she really appeared to be sick so that she could not possibly meet with Untermayer. I turned into 68th Street, stopped at a hotel to get a room for her.

Being in a better section, a black doorman in a red coat opened the car door where Aunt Anna lay on the seat practically unconscious. The doorman pulled Aunt Anna by the legs out of the car and I just could get close enough to prevent her head from dropping to the Street. The doorman and I carried then Aunt Anna to the hotel where unfortunately the doorman entered the revolving door, where of course we three got completely stuck, together with our heavy winter coats. This was a real dilemma. People wanted to get out, others wanted to enter, but nobody could move, and more and more people collected. At this point, a small Jewish hotel guest who probably had some subway experience, went back in the hall, took a good start and ran with full speed against the inner side of the revolving door so that the impulse projected the three of us into a heap on the floor of the hotel hall. Aunt Anna lay on the floor, moaning and complaining to be dying. Upon Sonny's questioning she only whispered, "the heart!". Sonny called for a doctor, tried to massage the heart until he came. Of course, they had to transport her to a room and there Sonny phoned Untermayer that Mrs. Eisenmenger could not come because of her fainting spell. He said, "that really does not matter, we have control of the situation, all harbors are blocked, and all railways are being watched." I just had the presence of mind to ask, "But what will be the expense?" Untermayer replied, "$2000 dollars per day". I nearly had a stroke!

Two days later, Aunt Anna went again to see Untermayer. Since I had to attend to my patients, I brought Aunt Anna to a subway station on a line that led directly to Untermayer's office. In the subway, Aunt Anna felt a little weak, so she wanted to buy some chocolate. However, she mistook chiclet for chocolate, and of course, the chewing gum had practically caused her teeth to get stuck so that Untermayer had to extricate the gum.

Untermayer actually handled the affair very well and the expense was less than I had feared. Aunt Anna had to return to Europe but was scheduled to come back the following year for the court proceedings. For the meantime I was made the official representative of the Archduchess together with a Mr. Perry from Untermayer's staff. For a whole year I had the necklace near me, had to hire a chauffeur and personal guard, but nobody had interest to acquire the necklace. I got so desperate that at the St. Patrick?s Day parade, I walked in crowds even though my personal guard warned not to do that. I thought that since the necklace was insured for one million dollars with Lloyds, should it be stolen, the Archduchess will get the money. But nobody made any attempt.

During the court proceedings it happened that someone approached Aunt Anna and said, "Al Capone who now is in prison, wants to offer one million dollars for the necklace!" When Aunt Anna came home and told us that, I told her: "When you do that, you will leave this house at once, that is out of the question."
In the course of the court process, the necklace was actually appraised to have one million dollars material value. The historical value could not be expressed in money value at all.

About two years later, the Maharajah of Haiderabud bought the necklace. What happened later on and particularly after World War II, I do not know.  
Hoberg, Anna (I33)
 
49 MARRIAGE TO WRAY MONROE

Wedding ceremony on Thurs 1/21/1993, followed by honeymoon trip to Hong Kong on 1/26. Wray takes annual trips sponsored by the Rotary Club for free clinical dental work. 
Eisenmenger, Hertha Emma (I12)
 
50 Nurse, lived with Hugo in the Bronx, NY. Returned to Austria in mid-1960's. Bob Flack meet Lydia only once when he helped Hertha Eisenmenger remove Hugo's ashes from under Lydia's bed to be spread over the Atlantic before she moved back home. Before then, Bob was unaware of his biological grandfather, having grown up with Ernst Weber in that family role. Alber, Lydia (I89)
 

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